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We challenge ourselves to transform human understanding of the changing Earth by enabling the integration of innovative technologies, open geodetic observations, and research, from pole to pole.

 
 

HIGHLIGHTS

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Data Event Response to the 27 July 2015 Mw 6.9 Earthquake 73km SW of Nikolski, Alaska

Data Event Response to the 27 July 2015 Mw 6.9 Earthquake 73km SW of Nikolski, Alaska

July 27, 2015

In response to the Mw 6.9 earthquake 73km southwest of Nikolski, Alaska on July 27, 2015, one-sample-per-second (1-sps) GPS data are being collected for a 7-day period around the event (day of event ± 3 days). Once downloaded, data will be available from ftp://data-out.unavco.org/pub/highrate/.

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Do You Call Yourself a Geodesist?

Do You Call Yourself a Geodesist?

July 28, 2015

UNAVCO asked 11 geoscientists at our March 2014 Science Workshop, “Do you call yourself a geodesist?” The answers were diverse and highlight the expanding research opportunities of geoscientists plus the expanding use of geodesy and geodetic tools in other fields of science and engineering.

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Mount St. Helens 35 Years Ago and Now

Mount St. Helens 35 Years Ago and Now

June 30, 2015

The 35th anniversary of the catastrophic May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens provided the opportunity to share with the public how far volcano monitoring has come in the last three and a half decades, and the role played by the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory in maintaining instrumentation on the volcano's flanks. What signs do scientists watch for leading up to an eruption? How do we measure deformation of a volcano?

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Summer 2015 Interns at UNAVCO

Summer 2015 Interns at UNAVCO

June 30, 2015

UNAVCO hosts three summer internships, each with a different focus: Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), Geo-Launchpad, and the UNAVCO Summer Internship Program (USIP).

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SCIENCE SNAPSHOTS

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The Highs and Lows of Water Loading in the Pacific Northwest from GPS

The Highs and Lows of Water Loading in the Pacific Northwest from GPS

May 6, 2015

Eight years of observations of millimeter-level vertical surface changes from a dense network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in the Pacific Northwest tracks a fluctuating water load due to varying precipitation. The observations track seasonal variations (i.e., more rain or snow in the fall and winter) and the drought of 2008-2010.

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Dike Growth and New Crust at Bárðarbunga Volcano, Iceland

Dike Growth and New Crust at Bárðarbunga Volcano, Iceland

June 23, 2015

Intrusive unrest at Bárðarbunga Volcano in Iceland in 2014 shows segmented lateral dike growth creating new crust where the tectonic plates separate.

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Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

July 26, 2013

GPS data were used to detect volcanic plumes from eruptions of Mount Redoubt in Alaska. Unlike past research, this study relied on the signal strength, or signal to noise ratio (SNR), data. The new method is powerful because simple models can be used to quickly model SNR data and the SNR data are not sensitive to water vapor.

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Ice Mass Loss on North Antarctic Peninsula Linked to Fluid Upper Mantle

Ice Mass Loss on North Antarctic Peninsula Linked to Fluid Upper Mantle

February 23, 2015

The North Antarctic Peninsula (NAP) has lost significant ice over decades and the amount and rate of land rebound as the ice is removed can be used to decipher the structure of the crust and upper mantle. Using vertical motion of the land recorded at the Palmer GPS site since 1995, augmented with other GPS data and a simple four-layer model yields a thicker crust and a more fluid upper mantle than expected.

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Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

February 6, 2013

The Mississippi Delta along the Gulf Coast of the United States is a major site of sediment deposition from the Mississippi River and conversely a major site of wetland loss from rising seas and subsidence. There is debate about how much and when the delta has risen or fallen due to deposition, subsidence, sea level change, and erosion.

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Mapping the Seafloor with Gravity Models

Mapping the Seafloor with Gravity Models

February 18, 2015

Most of the ocean floor is unknown. Gravity models generated from satellite radar altimetry provide one of the only ways to map the height of the seafloor beneath all of the oceans. Years of data and thousands of satellite tracks have yielded unprecedented detail of major spreading ridges and thousands of seamounts.

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Quality Assessment: A new technique to assess and monitor long-term quality of GPS data

Quality Assessment: A new technique to assess and monitor long-term quality of GPS data

March 7, 2013

Geoff Blewitt and Corne Kreemer of UNR’s Geodetic Laboratory have devised a new processing-based technique for evaluating site quality on an ongoing basis.

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Last modified: Friday, 31-Jul-2015 02:12:16 UTC

 

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