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We challenge ourselves to transform human understanding of the changing Earth by enabling the integration of innovative technologies, open geodetic observations, and research, from pole to pole.

 
 

HIGHLIGHTS

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Data Event Response to the 9 June 2016 Mw 6.1 Earthquake 17km E of Puerto Morazan, Nicaragua

Data Event Response to the 9 June 2016 Mw 6.1 Earthquake 17km E of Puerto Morazan, Nicaragua

July 1, 2016

In response to the Mw6.1 earthquake 17km E of Puerto Morazán, Nicaragua on 2016-06-10 at 03:25:22 (UTC), UNAVCO downloaded high-rate one-sample-per-second (1-sps or 1 Hz) data from nearby GPS stations for a 7-day period around the event (day of event ± 3 days).

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Geosphere Science—Positioning UNAVCO, Advancing Geodesy: The 2016 UNAVCO Science Workshop

Geosphere Science—Positioning UNAVCO, Advancing Geodesy: The 2016 UNAVCO Science Workshop

June 30, 2016

The theme of the 2016 UNAVCO Science Workshop, Geosphere Science – Positioning UNAVCO, Advancing Geodesy, brought together over 200 community members in Broomfield, Colorado, 29-31 March 2016. Geodesy is fueling discoveries in increasingly diverse disciplines ranging across all areas of Earth system sciences. Participants in the bi-annual UNAVCO Science Workshop explored how geodesy is enabling researchers to quantify processes that connect these spheres and tackle grand challenges in earth science.

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Data Event Response to the 10 June 2016 Mw 5.2 Earthquake 20km NNW of Borrego Springs, California

Data Event Response to the 10 June 2016 Mw 5.2 Earthquake 20km NNW of Borrego Springs, California

June 13, 2016

In response to the Mw 10 June 2016 Mw 5.2 Earthquake 20km NNW of Borrego Springs, California on 2016-06-10 at 12:09:02 (UTC) on 2016-04-16 23:58:37 (UTC), UNAVCO has processed high rate one-sample-per-second (1-sps or 1 Hz) borehole strainmeter data from borehole strainmeters in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and is downloading 5-samples-per-second (5-sps or 5 Hz) data for PBO GPS stations within an 80 km radius around the epicenter of the event.

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Data Event Response to the 16 April 2016 Mw 7.8 Earthquake 27km SSE of Muisne, Ecuador

Data Event Response to the 16 April 2016 Mw 7.8 Earthquake 27km SSE of Muisne, Ecuador

April 17, 2016

In response to the Mw 7.8 earthquake 7.8 Earthquake 27km SSE of Muisne, Ecuador on 2016-04-16 23:58:37 (UTC), UNAVCO has processed high rate one-sample-per-second (1-sps or 1 Hz) borehole strainmeter data from all borehole strainmeters in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The fully processed 1-sps borehole strainmeter (BSM) dataset spanning the time period of this event is now available at http://borehole.unavco.org/bsm/earthquakes/ 20160416_MuisneEcuador/.

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SCIENCE SNAPSHOTS

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Probabilities of Large Earthquakes in Alaska

Probabilities of Large Earthquakes in Alaska

August 11, 2016

Estimates of the probabilities of a magnitude greater than 9.0 earthquake for the Aleutian Islands are about 6.5 to 12 percent over the next 50 years. Such an event poses obvious earthquake and tsunami risks for Alaska and tsunami risks for western North America and Hawaii.

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Pinpointing Slip and Earthquake Location with the Guatemalan Geodetic Network

Pinpointing Slip and Earthquake Location with the Guatemalan Geodetic Network

June 14, 2016

The 7 November 2012 moment magnitude 7.4 Champerico (Guatemala) earthquake is among a growing number of subduction zone events observed by a local geodetic network. The GPS data show up to 2 meters of slip over a 30 by 30 square kilometer area on the fault at a depth of 10 to 30 kilometers. The data refine the location of the earthquake, increasing our understanding of faults and plate motions as well as earthquake risk resiliency.

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Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

Detecting Volcanic Plumes with GPS Data

July 26, 2013

GPS data were used to detect volcanic plumes from eruptions of Mount Redoubt in Alaska. Unlike past research, this study relied on the signal strength, or signal to noise ratio (SNR), data. The new method is powerful because simple models can be used to quickly model SNR data and the SNR data are not sensitive to water vapor.

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GPS Sensors Capture Glacial Earthquakes

GPS Sensors Capture Glacial Earthquakes

March 4, 2016

GPS sensors record the motion of the Helheim Glacier in Greenland as ice calving occurs at its terminus. As the iceberg rotates and rolls off sideways, the glacier springs backwards and moves downwards. This action produces an earthquake and the GPS sensors record all the motion and help to explain how glacial earthquakes occur.

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Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

Sea Level Rise on the U.S. Gulf Coast

February 6, 2013

The Mississippi Delta along the Gulf Coast of the United States is a major site of sediment deposition from the Mississippi River and conversely a major site of wetland loss from rising seas and subsidence. There is debate about how much and when the delta has risen or fallen due to deposition, subsidence, sea level change, and erosion.

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Mapping the Seafloor with Gravity Models

Mapping the Seafloor with Gravity Models

February 18, 2015

Most of the ocean floor is unknown. Gravity models generated from satellite radar altimetry provide one of the only ways to map the height of the seafloor beneath all of the oceans. Years of data and thousands of satellite tracks have yielded unprecedented detail of major spreading ridges and thousands of seamounts.

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Testing Earthquake Early Warning Using Geodetic Data in the Pacific Northwest

Testing Earthquake Early Warning Using Geodetic Data in the Pacific Northwest

August 16, 2016

The addition of geodetic data into the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network earthquake early warning system shows important enhancement to the warning system. Tests show the Geodetic First Approximation of Size and Time (G-FAST) could determine the characteristics of the 2001 Mw 6.8 Nisqually earthquake with sufficient robustness to warn communities at risk.

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Last modified: Monday, 15-Aug-2016 20:46:23 UTC

 

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