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2004 UNAVCO Highlights
Title Date
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (6) PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (6) Last Friday morning, the drillers arrived at the site early to prepare for the cement truck. Section by section, the drill rig pipe was put back together and inserted into the borehole until reaching the bottom. Once in place, the drillers connected the piping to the float shoe which was welded onto the piece of casing resting at the bottom of the hole.
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2004-11-16
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (5) PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (5) Hurray - it`s done! Crews completed the drilling for the first of eight strainmeter boreholes in the PNW.
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2004-11-16
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (4) PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (4) BRRRRR! Crews woke up to temperatures below freezing, making it hard to roll out of bed and get working in the chilly weather. Regardless, activity at the site began at the usual time of 7am by taking another depth measurement of the borehole. Due to some soft settling of materials at the bottom of the hole, the hole depth measured 506 feet. The big mission today: install enough 6-inch casing to line the entire borehole from bottom to top.
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2004-11-05
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (3) PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (3) Day number three of the BSM activity at Clark West continues. Crews are thankful for the beautiful morning weather, sunny and clear skies with temperatures in the fifties. While waiting for the loggers to arrive from Seattle, WA, people kept busy around the work site moving rock and piles of cuttings, preparing casing, and bagging samples. Overnight, water had filled the majority of the hole, stopping at just 31 feet below the ground surface. By 11am, the logging crew from Golder Associates were on site and ready to begin a series of four different logging tests. Each test takes quite a bit of time, having to lower the instrument to the bottom of the drill hole and slowly pull it up to the top, continuously taking measurements along the way.
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2004-11-04
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (2) PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! (2) Last night a cold front came in, dumping almost an inch of rain at the drill site. Although the rain had stopped by the time everyone arrived at the drill site at AM, the temperature had fallen to a cold and damp 40 degrees.
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2004-11-03
PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! PBO Strainmeter Installation Update: A Whole New Frontier! After a year of planning and organizing, today marks the onset of drilling for the first of 175 strainmeters. PBO is installing a network of state-of-the-art strainmeter instruments. The strainmeters use a mechanical extensometers and very sensitive displacement transducers to measure extension in three directions across a borehole. Sensitive enough to easily detect solid earth tides, observed changes in strain will enable scientists to monitor tectonic deformation between the Pacific and North America plates.
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2004-11-02
Alaska Region Modifies GPS Monument In Order to Install on Difficult Terrain at Critical Location Alaska Region Modifies GPS Monument In Order to Install on Difficult Terrain at Critical Location It is expected that for each of the 875 PBO GPS stations installed, small modifications will need to be made in order to accommodate the vastly different rock and terrain conditions. Most recently, the PBO Alaska field engineers proved to be masterminds by creating a hybrid of the short and deep drilled braced monument in order to install the instrument at a scientifically critical point in Alaska...
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2004-10-31
PBO Sends Emergency Response Team to Mt. St. Helens (2) PBO Sends Emergency Response Team to Mt. St. Helens (2) By the end of the day Wednesday, the PBO X-Men team finished the majority of the second station, P693. After Jackson and Feaux retrofitted the monument, workers from P697 flew over the crater of the volcano to join in on the P693 installation fun. Once again, a completed swing set was successfully slung over the volcano and dropped at the site. Borenstein and Friesen worked on installing the enclosures and antenna, finishing the installation by dusk.
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2004-10-14
PBO Sends Emergency Response Team to Mt. St. Helens PBO Sends Emergency Response Team to Mt. St. Helens PBO Director Dr. Mike Jackson and Rocky Mountain Regional Engineer Steve Borenstein hit the road in a flash from Boulder, CO, Sunday morning in response to the unexpected recent activity at Mt. St. Helens. Having spent the previous week gathering emergency response GPS materials, packing up the UNAVCO truck and trailer, and making sure their living wills are up to date, Jackson and Borenstein began driving across the country in a Ford F350 truck making just one stop on the way: to pick up PBO's Basin & Range Regional Engineer, Greg Hilker, from Salt Lake City, UT.
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2004-10-13
PBO Sends Emergency Response Teams to Parkfield Earthquake PBO Sends Emergency Response Teams to Parkfield Earthquake In response to the recent magnitude 6.0 earthquake, PBO crews from the California offices have spent the last two weeks working hard to install a total of five emergency response GPS stations in Parkfield, CA.
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2004-10-08
RETREAT, Italy and Croatia RETREAT (Retreating-trench, Extension, and Accretion Tectonics) is a multidisciplinary project to develop a self-consistent dynamic model of syn-convergent extension, using the northern Apennines, northern Italy, as a natural laboratory.
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2004-10
Antarctic Program Support 2004-2005 A record 80 geodetic GPS receivers were deployed by UNAVCO Polar Services to Antarctica in support of 25 individual PI-based projects in the United States Antarctic Program.
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2004-10
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (12) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (12) Whew! What an incredible adventure! Those of you who have been following the progress of the Augustine project are aware that the installation and base camp updates suddenly stopped on September 18, 2004. Due to the unpredictability of Mother Nature, our internet connection was cut off when strong winds and rain storms circled Augustine. Starting where we left off, here's how the rest of the journey continued...
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2004-09-30
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (11) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (11) YAY! Yesterday, crews completed volcano station AV05 and mainland station AC27. Charna Meth helped Tom Corbett and Mike Jackson apply finishing touches on the mainland station while Barrett Friesen and Seth Friedly finished AV05. Some of the VIPs rode along in the helicopter to make minor adjustments to a couple of the finished stations. Later in the day the wind was calm enough, a trip to the summit of the volcano was made where Mike Jackson deployed another USGS campaign station. Today, crews will be slinging gear back to base camp from a couple of the stations and applying any necessary final touches to the completed stations.
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2004-09-18
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (10) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (10) While high winds kept crews away from mainland site AC27 yesterday, Charna Meth helped as Mike Jackson installed two campaign stations on the volcano for USGS. Winds at AV05 were light enough in the morning to get Karl Feaux, Dave Mencin, Barrett Friesen, and Seth Friedly up to the site working on the installation. Working conditions became rough when the wind picked up, throwing pea-sized rocks into the faces of the crew, and making it difficult to keep equipment and materials from blowing away. By 4:30 p.m., when they were scheduled to be picked up by the helicopter, winds were so heavy that the aircraft was unable to land at AV05.
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2004-09-17
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (9) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (9) Yesterday, workers completed about 98% of station AC27. Fortunately the weather was nice, with a little bit of a breeze keeping the mosquitoes away for the majority of the day. Once again the crew was safe from bears, but was joined by a small herd of caribou near the station. Meanwhile, another crew was able to make it up to AV05, finishing about 50% of the installation by the end of the day. Although it was pretty cold up at the top, the skies were mostly clear and sunny.
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2004-09-16
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (8) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (8) By the end of Tuesday, three holes were drilled for mainland station AC27, and the hut was slung over and put into place. Heavy winds and frozen rain created hard working conditions for most of the day. We continue to be fortunate enough not to have any bear encounters. While that crew was working on station AC27, Dave Mencin and Steve Borenstein brought more batteries and a repeater for communications to station AV02. The repeater will enable mainland station AC27 to communicate with Homer. A quick stop at AV04 allowed the crew to modify a power connection and hook up grounding rod and wire.
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2004-09-15
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (7) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (7) Unfortunately, heavy winds kept the crews at camp for most the day Monday. Flying into the wind, it took the AC27 crew 45 minutes to fly 20 miles over to the mainland from Base Camp. Once near the site, the pilot turned the aircraft around due to strong wind and turbulence, fearing that a return flight to pick the crew up might be too risky. Returning to Base Camp only took 15 minutes since the helicopter was flying with the wind. Unfortunately, it was also too windy to reach AV05, the last volcano station to be installed.
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2004-09-14
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (6) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (6) A crew headed over to the mainland yesterday to take a look at the proposed location for AC27. Due to bad bedrock, the site will be moved about a mile south of its originally planned location. Mike Jackson and Ben Pauk circumnavigated the volcano yesterday afternoon to collect metadata from stations. Due to high winds, they were only able to make it to stations AV02 and AV03.
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2004-09-13
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (5) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (5) Moving right along! As of end of the day Saturday, crews have completed a total of five out of seven stations. The last two stations to install are AC27 and AV05. AC27 is located on Chenik Mountain in the McNeil River State Game Refuge, and AV05 is located on the northeast side of the volcano at 3500 feet.
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2004-09-12
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (4) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (4) Yesterday (Friday, September 10, 2004) was definitely the chilliest day so far; clouds covered the volcano keeping the visibility low. By the end of the day, crews had completed the drilling and set up the swing set for site AV02. Sleet-like rain made it hard for workers to keep dry and warm. Needless to say, everyone was very happy to return to base camp at the end of the day.
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2004-09-11
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (3) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (3) Yesterday a crew flew to the Cook Inlet where the AC59 site is located. Overcast skies and rain didn`t stop the crew from getting a good start on the installation. The crew installed all electronics and drilled two holes for the monument. Unfortunately, they encountered highly fractured and weathered rock below the surface of the planned drilling location, making it necessary find a new area to install the monument.
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2004-09-10
Augustine Volcano Installation Update (2) Augustine Volcano Installation Update (2) The Augustine project continues to be on schedule. Yesterday, crews finished the installation at site AV04 and came close to completing AV01. Today the weather has changed and clouds are coming down over the volcano. Although it represents a change in plans, it`s hard not to be in awe of the thick, smoky white clouds rolling and billowing over the top of Augustine. The temperature has dropped quite a bit and it looks like it might rain. Because of the clouds the helicopter will not be able to fly up to the AV05 site. Currently a field crew is up at the AV01 site putting the final pieces together and should be finished shortly. A second crew is heading over the main land to work on the Ursus Head site, AC59.
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2004-09-09
Augustine Volcano Installation Update Augustine Volcano Installation Update Base camp on Augustine Volcano is fully set up and operating about 60 yards away from the shore on the west side of the volcano. Surrounded by tall, thick brush, we had to clear an area large enough for a helicopter landing pad, base camp kitchen, and sleeping tents. One large weather port is set up to act as the main common area for cooking, eating, and working. Two smaller structures serve as storage room for food and equipment. The Homer internet trailer is set up and camp is now connected to the internet using a Hughes DC powered VSAT system. Field days start at 6:30 AM and finish at about 9:30 PM with helicopters ferrying people on and off the volcano installations sites. Handheld radios are used to communicate between the aircraft, installation sites, and base camp. Satellite phones are used for emergency communications and internet keeps the camp in touch with the world.
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2004-09-08
Three New DDBM Installations in Washington State Katrin Hafner and Peter Gray (Pacific Northwest Region) were busy during the month of June installing three Deep Drilled Braced Monuments (DDBM) in Washington state. Assisted by Karl Feaux and Steve Borenstein of the PBO Boulder office, all three sites were finished in nine days and have been transmitting data through VSAT or VSAT/radio combination.
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2004-08
Glacial Rebound GPS is measuring the present motions associated with the response of the earth to the great mile-thick ice sheets that covered the area 18,000 years ago. Long after the glaciers melted, we use the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites to "see" the land moving -- up to half an inch per year in some places -- as the earth rebounds in response to the ice that once pushed the land down.
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2004-07
Strategic Planning Meeting - May, 2004 A Strategic Planning Meeting was held at Estes Park, Colorado as a first step in preparing a strategic plan to guide UNAVCO over the time period 2005 to 2009.
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2004-05
Bench Glacier Campaign Four Trimble 5700 GPS receivers were deployed on Bench Glacier (Chugach Range, Alaska) near Valdez, with a fifth receiver serving as the reference base station on bedrock. Shad O'Neel provided field support to deploy the receivers. The project measures precise uplift and surface strains associated with the passage of a seasonal wave measured last year by Robert Anderson.
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2004-05
BARGEN Network Maintenance Maintenance was performed at two GPS sites in the Basin and Range Geodetic Network (BARGEN) in northwestern Nevada. A telemetry relay antenna at the summit of Mt. Lewis was repaired.
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2004-05
Toolik Field Station DGPS system A survey grade real-time differential GPS system was installed for dedicated use at Toolik Field Station (TFS) on the north side of Alaska's Brooks Range. The Trimble 5700 receiver system meets the emerging demand for centimeter-level surveys, and is capable of both real-time and post processed surveys.
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2004-05
Surveying with UNAVCO GPS Equipment During the first week of April, fifteen scientists came to UNAVCO to participate in the inaugural Surveying with UNAVCO equipment. The purpose of this course was to train the diverse community of scientists in the steps required to perform a survey with GPS.
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2004-04
Campaign Receiver Testing for Plate Boundary Observatory The UNAVCO Facility routinely performs equipment tests in support of community activities. Recently, the Facility has been testing GPS receivers for procurement by the Plate Boundary Observatory project, including receivers for permanent stations, and receivers intended for Campaign use.
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2004-03
Saudi Arabia In March of 2002, two new permanent GPS stations were deployed in Saudi Arabia. They were remotely located, DC powered sites with cellular modems installed for wireless communications, and data transfers.
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2004-03
Harvest Oil Platform, California A communications link upgrade was the goal on the latest visit to the Harvest Oil Platform off the coast of Santa Maria, California. Prior to the installation of the HUGHES VSAT satellite system, a cell phone link had been the reliable method for data retrieval from the platform.
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2004-03
The first PBO deep monument installation at Marshall Field, Boulder, CO February 5th and 6th, 2004: The first PBO deep monument installation at Marshall Field, Boulder, CO.
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2004-02
Easter Island Permanent IGS Station Installation (ISPA) and Existing Site (EISL) Maintenance Station Isla de Pascua (ISPA) was established at Latitude: S 27.12498 and Longitude: W 109.34441. This new Easter Island station was installed to replace the existing station EISL, which has lost sky view due to the proliferation of Eucalyptus trees, and also to utilize the new IRIS VSAT Internet link.
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2004-02
West Antarctica TIDES Project Ice from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet flows to the sea through a series of ice streams; the factors controlling the flow of the ice streams are not well understood. Recent observations give a brief glimpse of the surprisingly sensitive reaction of the ice streams to tidal oscillations.
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2004-01
 

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