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Short Courses

2014 Short Courses

In response to community requests and interest, UNAVCO provides an annual series of short courses focussed on UNAVCO tools and data streams. These courses are for current researchers who want to refresh their skills or explore the use of new tools, and for early career scientists such as post doctoral fellows, graduate students, and upper level undergraduates who want to learn the latest geodetic techniques.

Upcoming Short Courses


Introduction to GPS Geodesy and High Precision Observations
July 14-18, 2014
Times: Course will begin at 9:00am on 14 July and end at 4:00pm on 18 July
Location: Institute and Observatory of Geophysics at Antananarivo (IOGA), University of Antananarivo, Madagascar
Contact D. Sarah Stamps for any additional questions at dstamps mit.edu

This course is aimed at teaching (1) the underlying principles of Global Positioning System (GPS) applications in geodesy, (2) techniques for high-precision observations, and (3) data processing with GAMIT-GLOBK. Educational materials are designed for graduate students and professionals interested in GPS geodesy, particularly with applications in geophysics. Instructions will be in English. Computers and required software will be provided on-site.

Brief Agenda:
Each day involves lectures from 9:00am-12:00pm and afternoon laboratory exercises from 1:00pm – 4:00pm. Laboratory exercises include hands-on training in GPS observations

Instructors:
D. Sarah Stamps, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, dstamps mit.edu
Saria Elifuraha, PhD, Ardhi University, saria.elifurahagmail.com
Rui Xu, PhD, Sichuan Earthquake Bureau, xurui8mitgmail.com

Registration information:
Registration is open to students, researchers, and professionals. After your application is reviewed, you will receive notification in the next few weeks.
No travel support is available. Space is limited to the number of on-site computers.

Computers:
Computers and required software will be provided on-site.


Past Short Courses

Working with Strainmeter Data
Monday, March 3, 2014 from 8:00am - 5:00pm
Optional data viewing on Friday, March 7 from 8am - 12pm
Omni Interlocken Hotel in Broomfield, Colorado. This short course is being held in conjunction with the UNAVCO Science Workshop
Instructors: Karen Luttrell, LSU; Jessica Hawthorne, Caltech; Evelyn Roeloffs, USGS; and Kathleen Hodgkinson, UNAVCO

Sign up for this short course while registering for the UNAVCO Science Workhop. More information about the UNAVCO Science Worshop is available here. You will be contacted in mid-February with more details.

If your research involves modeling strain transients along plate boundary faults, analyzing the evolution of Episodic Tremor and Slip signals, studying the Earth tides or strains induced by atmospheric pressure, seiches or the passage of seismic waves then you might be interested in this course. Students will learn how strainmeters work, study examples where the data were used to model strain transients, basic processing steps and how to access the strainmeter data.

The first day will be a mix of presentations and open discussion on analyzing strainmeter data. Questions and discussion of issues particular to each participants field of interest are welcome. Kathleen will also be available on Friday, March 7, for those who would like to spend extra time looking at more data. Students are encouraged to bring their own data or examples of what they would like to work on.

Short Course Materials


Hydrogeodesy Short Course
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 from 1:00pm to 4:30pm
Omni Interlocken Hotel in Broomfield, Colorado. This short course is being held in conjunction with the UNAVCO Science Workshop
Instructors:
Kristine Larson, University of Colorado, email kristinem.larsongmail.com and her website
Shimon Wdowinski, University of Miami, email shimonwrsmas.miami.edu and his website

Sign up for this short course while registering for the UNAVCO Science Workhop. More information about the UNAVCO Science Worshop is available here.

This short course will be led by Kristine Larson (CU) and Shimon Wdowinski (RSMAS). Requirements - A laptop with matlab software installed. If you would like to use something other than Matlab, please contact Kristine Larson prior to the workshop to discuss libraries.

Agenda
1:00pm - 2:30pm Using GPS to measure snow depth, sea level, and vegetation growth, K. Larson
2:30pm - 3:00pm Break
3:00pm - 4:30pm Using InSAR to measure surface and subsurface water movements, S. Wdowinski

Reflected signals (multipath) are an insidious and annoying error source in GPS positioning applications. However, in some situations GPS reflections can be turned into useful hydrologic quantities using simple interferometric relationships. In this short course Kristine Larson will briefly overview how reflections can be quantified from GPS signal to noise ratio (SNR) data. Attendees will then use SNR data to either measure snow depth at Niwot Ridge, CO or sea level at Friday Harbor, WA.

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a very powerful technique for detecting cm-level displacements of the Earth's surface over wide swaths (5-400 km) with high spatial resolution (1-100 m pixel resolution). It is widely used to study earthquake and magmatic induced crustal deformation as well as glacier flow. InSAR is also very effective in hydrological studies, as it provides high spatial resolution observations of surface changes induced by surface and subsurface water movements. Hydrological applications of InSAR include wetland surface flow, aquifer deformation and storage change, soil moisture content, and snowpack mass distribution. The course will cover the basic principles of InSAR, data type, data processing, InSAR time series, and the various hydrological applications. The course also includes a tutorial on using InSAR observations for studying wetland and aquifer hydrology.

Short Course Materials


Imaging and Analyzing Southern California’s Active Faults with Lidar A joint SCEC, OpenTopography, UNAVCO and EarthScope short course.
November 4-6, 2013
San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), UCSD, La Jolla, CA
Supported by Southern California Earthquake Center, OpenTopography, UNAVCO, and EarthScope
Oranizers: J. Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO; Emily Kleber, Arizona State University

We anticipate space for 35-40 participants in the course. Partial travel support will be available for course attendees, with preference given to students. In the event of high demand, admission preference will be given to researchers working on active faulting in southern California.

Lidar data has become an important tool for earthquake scientists to make detailed observations and model surface evolution. Within the last 7 years, several efforts have been made to collect high resolution topographic data for active faults (e.g. The B4 project, EarthScope and NCALM projects). These datasets are available freely online through OpenTopography, a NSF funded lidar data distribution portal. The active tectonics community has taken great interest in these exciting datasets, using them to generate new and important insights into earthquake processes in Southern California.

OpenTopography in partnership with SCEC, UNAVCO, and EarthScope will host a short course at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UCSD, November 4-6, 2013. This 3-day course will highlight recent research results and provide beginner to intermediate training on airborne and terrestrial lidar technology, point cloud and raster-based data processing, and active fault-oriented analysis. We will emphasize fault trace and geomorphic mapping applications, topographic differencing, integration with other geospatial data, and data visualization and analysis approaches.

For more information and agenda, please see the announcement page


Introduction to Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) for Earth Science Research . (GSA course 501)
Friday, October 25, 2013 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
UNAVCO, Boulder, CO
US$54; includes lunch.
Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8.
Cosponsor: UNAVCO
Instructors: Christopher Crosby, UNAVCO; Marianne Okal, UNAVCO; David Phillips, UNAVCO; Carlos Aiken, The University of Texas at Dallas

This one-day short course will provide earth science faculty, students and professionals with an introduction to the principles of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS - a.k.a., ground-based lidar). TLS enables the capture of very high-resolution three-dimensional images of geologic features, and has emerged as a powerful tool for applications ranging from outcrop mapping to documentation and analysis of active earth surface processes. The course will focus on TLS technology, data collection, processing and analysis workflows, and examples of science applications. The course will consist of a combination of lectures and hands-on demonstrations of TLS equipment and data processing.

For more information and to register for GSA short courses, please see the GSA 2013 Short Courses page.

InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications using ROI_pac and GIAnT
July 29-31, 2013
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 9 AM on July 29 and end at 5 PM on July 31.

The goal of this short course is to train scientists in the methods and practices of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar), a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. Terabytes of InSAR data were collected for the EarthScope program that spans the entire United States. Training scientists new to InSAR for the interpretation of these important data sets is critical to the EarthScope mission. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). This short course will also help prepare scientists for exploiting data from upcoming InSAR-capable missions, including one currently being planned by NASA.

New techniques and applications of InSAR are being developing all the time, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. While this 3-day workshop will focus on the fundamentals of InSAR, basic processing and applications for new users, the knowledge gained should prepare attendees to better understand and utilize the newer techniques.

If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The course includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, a detailed introduction to the installation and use of the JPL/Caltech ROI_pac processing package, and an overview of other processing packages. The related technique of pixel offset tracking or sub-pixel correlation with SAR images will also be covered. In extended hands-on sessions ("tinker time"), the students will use the ROI_pac software to process example data. In a half-day session, we will introduce the Generic InSAR Analysis Toolbox (GIAnT) to show how time-series analysis of InSAR data can extract additional information.

Participants will be expected to know basic UNIX or Linux command line usage. Students must apply for WInSAR data access through their University representative (http://winsar.unavco.org/reps.html) if they don't already have a WInSAR account. In addition, it would be helpful if participants apply for access to the ALOS PALSAR data the Alaska Satellite Facility as a WInSAR member. A computer will be provided with the packages to use during the course.

Instructors:
Eric Fielding, Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech, Eric.Fieldingjpl.nasa.gov
Walter Szeliga, Central Washington University, waltergeology.cwu.edu
Piyush Shanker Agram, Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech, Piyush.Agramjpl.nasa.gov
Scott Baker, UNAVCO, bakerunavco.org


GPS Data Processing and Analysis with GAMIT/GLOBK/TRACK
July 8-12, 2013
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 09:00 on July 8 and end at noon on July 12.

The workshop will be divided into three parts to accommodate differing levels of experience and both static and kinematic applications. Monday's sessions will be devoted to new users who need assistance with installation of the software and basic processing with GAMIT and GLOBK. Tuesday afternoon through Wednesday will feature lectures on reference frame realization, error analysis, and efficient processing of both continuous and survey-model observations. Thursday and Friday will focus on kinematic measurements and GPS seismology, including real-time processing. Participants interested only in static measurements may wish to remain through Thursday for one-on-one tutoring in a parallel session.

Participants must bring their own laptops running a Unix-type system (Linux, Mac OSX), and are encouraged to install and exercise the software well before the course and to bring their own data sets for tutoring assistance.

Brief Agenda:

  • Mon am: Software installation
  • Mon pm: Standard processing with GAMIT and GLOBK

  • Tue am: Tutorials on GAMIT and GLOBK
  • Tue pm: Reference frames and error analysis

  • Wed am: Data editing and weighting, handling earthquakes
  • Wed pm: Processing large cGPS and sGPS data sets

  • Thu am: Kinematic and short-session static measurements
  • Thu pm: Real-time kinematic processing

  • Fri am: Discussion and tutorials

Instructors:
Tom Herring (tahmit.edu)
Mike Floyd (mfloydmit.edu)
Bob King (rwkchandler.mit.edu)


InSAR Processing and Theory with GMTSAR
June 26 - 28, 2013
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 9 AM on June 26 and end an 12 PM on June 28.

This 2.5 day course will cover the theory and application of InSAR processing. Lectures and exercises will be given to teach the basic theoretical aspects of InSAR. Labs will include software installation, running test data sets for standard interferogram formation as well as more advanced processing for stacking of interferograms and ScanSAR interferometry.

Students will also learn how to select data from the InSAR archives at UNAVCO and the Alaska Satellite Facility for their application. Students will need to bring their own laptop computer with more than 1.5 Gbytes of memory, running a UNIX operating system and a C-compiler. Computer code, documentation, and sample data sets can be downloaded from the following site: http://topex.ucsd.edu/gmtsar. Students must apply for WInSAR data access through their University representative (http://winsar.unavco.org/reps.html) or apply for access through WInSAR and the Alaska Satellite Facility. Students are strongly encouraged to install the GMTSAR software prior to the workshop and should seek assistance from the instructors.

Instructors:
David Sandwell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, dsandwellucsd.edu
Rob Mellors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, mellors1llnl.gov
Xiaopeng Tong, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Scott Baker, UNAVCO


Finite Element Modeling of Deformation at Volcanoes
May 21-23, 2013
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 8:30am on Tuesday, May 21st and will end at 5pm on Thursday, May 23rd.

This short course will describe how to design and construct models to describe deformation observed using geodetic methods (Global Positioning System — GPS — and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar — InSAR) at volcanic systems using the finite element method (FEM) The purpose of this workshop will be to display the powerful capabilities of this approach to the geophysical community via a user-friendly learning environment. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to design, construct, and implement FEM models that simulate changes in magma storage, which can be used in forward and inverse modeling. Students will then understand how to conduct simulations of transient post-eruption processes, including poroelastic, thermoelastic, and viscoelastic rheologies. Students will receive a bound manual of course materials. In addition, Simulia Incorporated has agreed to provide the latest version of Abaqus SE software to each student at no cost. Students should bring their own laptop computers having Windows OS, if possible.

The intended audience is graduate students or advanced undergraduate students pursuing research in volcanology. The course will be limited to a maximum of 10 students, who will be selected from a pool of applicants. Prerequisites include: (a) one year of undergraduate physics; (b) mathematics through calculus; (c) some experience with a computer programming language. Differential equations and/or linear (matrix) algebra would be helpful.

Instructors: Prof. Kurt Feigl, University of Wisconsin-Madison, feiglwisc.edu and Prof. Tim Masterlark, South Dakota School of Mines, timothy.masterlarksdsmt.edu


Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) Methods and Applications in Geologic Research & Education. (GSA course 525)

Sunday, 4 November 2012
8am – 5pm
Charlotte, NC
US$36, includes lunch. Limited financial support is available for students; see the link below to apply.
Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8.
Cosponsor: UNAVCO
David Phillips, UNAVCO; John Oldow, The University of Texas at Dallas; Carlos Aiken, The University of Texas at Dallas.

Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), a.k.a. ground-based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data, an overview of various TLS platforms, and examples of science and education applications. This 1-day workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high-resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire, and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring.

Workshop materials and presentations are available online.

Limited financial support is available for students (see the Financial Support for Short Course Series participants). For more information and to register for GSA short courses, please see http://www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/courses.htm


InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications for Geoscientist
August 13 - 15, 2012
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 8am on Monday, August 13th and will end at 5pm on Wednesday, August 15th.

The goal of this short course is to train scientists in the methods and practices of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar), a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. Terabytes of InSAR data were collected for the EarthScope program that spans the entire US. Training scientists new to InSAR for the interpretation of these important data sets is critical to the EarthScope mission. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). This short course will also help prepare scientists for exploiting data from upcoming InSAR-capable missions, including one currently being planned by NASA.

New techniques and applications of InSAR are being developing all the time, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. While this 3-day workshop will focus on the fundamentals of InSAR, basic processing and applications for new users, the knowledge gained should prepare attendees to better understand and utilize the newer techniques.

If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The course includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, a detailed introduction to the installation and use of the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC processing package, and an overview of other processing packages. The related technique of pixel offset tracking or sub-pixel correlation with SAR images will also be covered. In extended hands-on sessions ("tinker time"), the students will use the ROI_PAC software to process example data. A half-day session will introduce a new processing package called the InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE), which is a joint endeavor between JPL and Stanford featuring modernized object-oriented code for greater extensibility, and support for newer platforms, including TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed. ISCE installation will be part of another hands-on session.

Instructors: Paul Rosen, JPL; Eric Fielding, JPL; Walter Szeliga, Central Washington Universit; and Matthew Pritchard, Cornell University

For more information and to register for the InSar Short Course, please click here


Static and Kinematic GPS-based Positioning Using GIPSY/OASIS
May 23 - 25, 2012
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 8am on Wednesday, May 23th and will end at 12pm on Friday, May 25th.

This course will cover the fundamentals of using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) GIPSY/OASIS software package to perform static and kinematic precise point positioning from GPS data. It will include a mix between presentations and hands-on processing of data by participants to derive GPS-based observations of station position, clock, and troposphere. The presentations will be centered around GIPSY's primary user interface for GPS-based positioning, and gradually develop into descriptions of the GIPSY modules that are being executed by that tool. Strategies and options for achieving optimal positioning accuracy with GIPSY will be discussed, including data editing, troposphere modeling, antenna calibration, loading, and especially GIPSY's single receiver ambiguity resolution capability using JPL's GPS orbit and clock products. Participants will have an opportunity to process both course-provided data and samples of their own data (should they choose to bring their own data, e.g. RINEX files). User resources such as software for network processing, GIPSY and QOCA modules for time series analysis, the GIPSY Forum and GIPSY Licensing will also be highlighted.

Instructors: Susan Owen and Shailen Desai, JPL


GPS Data Processing Using GAMIT/GLOBK and TRACK

9-13 January 2012
Montserrat Volcano Observatory, Montserrat, West Indies
This workshop will include both static and kinematic processing of GPS data with an emphasis on regional tectonics and volcano monitoring. It will include lectures and one-on-one tutoring of both continuous and survey-mode measurements; defining, global, regional, and local reference frames; temporal and spatial filtering of time series; modeling tropospheric, antenna, and loading effects in height estimates; combining solutions to estimate post-seismic and long-term crustal deformation; handling step-displacements due to earthquakes and instrument changes; developing an error model for velocity estimates, and high-rate GPS for seismic surface waves. Participants will be expected to have exercised the software on their own before the workshop and should bring laptops with the software installed or with remote access to their own labs.

To register send an email to Dr Henry Odbert (henrymvo.ms).
Instructor: Tom Herring, MIT


GPS Data Analysis and Modeling Using GAMIT/GLOBK and TDEFNODE

28 November - 2 December 2011
University of the Philippines, Diliman
This workshop will combine static GPS data processing and analysis with modeling of secular and time-dependent motion of GPS stations. It will include lectures and one-on-one tutoring in static processing of both continuous and survey-mode measurements; defining, global, regional, and local reference frames; temporal and spatial filtering of time series; modeling tropospheric, antenna, and loading effects in height estimates; combining solutions to estimate post-seismic and long-term crustal deformation; handling step-displacements due to earthquakes and instrument changes; and developing an error model for velocity estimates. Tutoring will be based on data sets participants bring on their own laptops. Participants will be expected to have installed and exercised GAMIT/GLOBK and/or TDEFNODE prior to the workshop.

To register send an email to Bob King (rwkchandler.mit.edu).
Instructors: Bob King, MIT; Rob McCaffrey, Portland State


GPS Data Processing Using GAMIT/GLOBK

17-19 November 2011
University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
This 3-day short-course will cover intermediate and advanced issues in GPS analysis for crustal motion studies and meteorolical studies. Topics include static processing of both continuous and survey-mode measurements; defining, global, regional, and local reference frames; temporal and spatial filtering of time series; modeling tropospheric, antenna, and loading effects; combining solutions to estimate long-term crustal deformation; and developing an error model for velocity estimates. Participants are expected to have installed and exercised the software prior to the workshop. Tutoring will be based on data sets participants bring on their own laptops. There will also be a half-day session on ionospheric studies using the Boston College TEC processing software.

Register at the AfricaArray Workshop web site: http://www.africaarray.psu.edu.
Instructors: Bob King, MIT; Henry Berglund, UNAVCO


Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground based LiDAR) Methods and Applications in Geologic Research & Education (Tentative)

October 8, 2011
Minneapolis, MN (GSA)
This workshop will provide faculty, students and professionals with the basic principles of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), a.k.a. ground‐based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data, an overview of various TLS platforms, and examples of science and education applications. This 1‐day workshop will consist of lectures and hands‐on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high‐resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire, and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring. Limited financial support is available for students


InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications for Geoscientists

August 8 - 10, 2011
UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, Colorado
Course will begin at 1 pm on Monday, August 8th and will end at 5pm on Wednesday, August 10th. If you prefer not to participate in the optional module, the course will end around 3pm on Wednesday, August 10.

InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. Terabytes of InSAR data were collected for the EarthScope program that spans the entire US. Training new scientists for the interpretation of these important data sets is critical to the EarthScope mission. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). This short course will also help prepare scientists for the upcoming NASA InSAR mission, now called DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice). New techniques and applications of InSAR are rapidly developing, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. A 2.5 day workshop will introduce InSAR processing and applications to new users. If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The workshop includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, an introduction to a common processing package, and an overview of different processing packages. In a hands-on session (“tinker time”), the students will use the InSAR software to process example data. An additional optional module on Wednesday afternoon will cover subpixel ground motions from glaciers, landslides, earthquakes, etc. measured from pairs of optical and SAR images using a technique called pixel or feature tracking.
Faculty: Paul Rosen, JPL; Eric Fielding, JPL; and Matthew Pritchard, Cornell University


GPS Data Processing Using GAMIT/GLOBK

August 9 - 10, 2011
Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey

This short course is organized by Dokuz Eylul University and led by Prof Tom Herring of MIT. It will include lectures and one-on-one tutoring in static processing of both continuous and survey-mode measurements; defining, global, regional, and local reference frames; temporal and spatial filtering of time series; modeling tropospheric, antenna, and loading effects in height estimates; combining solutions to esimate post-seismic and long-term crustal deformation; handling step-displacements due to earthquakes and instrument changes; and developing an error model for velocity estimates. Tutoring will be based on data sets participants bring on their own laptops. Participants will be expected to have installed and exercised GAMIT and GLOBK prior to the workshop, and to be familiar with the 'Introduction to GAMIT/GLOBK', 'GAMIT Reference Manual', and 'GLOBK Reference Manual'. Much of the lecture material will be the same as prior courses, so a review of the presentations from the recent Lima GAMIT workshop could be useful.
Faculty: Tom Herring, MIT


Post-processing and Real Time Kinematic GPS data analysis with track and trackRT

April 26-27, 2011
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado.
The workshop will taught by Tom Herring and feature kinematic processing using TRACK and it's real-time counterpart TrackRT. The track portion will focus on both moving object analyses such as precise aircraft trajectories and slower movements such as ice streams and ocean buoys, and will also examine strategies for observing seismic surface waves. The trackRT portion will focus on installation requirements, command file tuning, and interactions with trackRT while it is running. Grants to assist students with travel expenses may be available. This course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and tutoring. Participants should have a reasonable knowledge of GPS theory and Unix and have used the software enough to be proficient in standard processing. Tutoring will be based on data sets participants bring on their own laptops.
Instructor: Tom Herring (MIT)


GPS Data Processing Using GAMIT/GLOBK

March 14-18, 2011
Lima, Peru
This workshop is organized by Instituto Geofisico del Peru (IGP) and Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (UNMSM) and will cover static processing of both continuous and survey-mode measurements: defining global, regional, and local reference frames; temporal and spatial filtering of time series; modeling tropospheric, antenna, and loading effects in height estimates; combining solutions; handling step-displacements due to earthquakes and instrument changes; and developing an error model for velocity estimates. There will be an introduction to modeling crustal deformation but no hands-on work with specific software. This course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and tutoring. Tutoring will be based on data sets participants bring on their own laptops. Participants will be expected to have installed and exercised GAMIT and GLOBK prior to the workshop, and to be familiar with the Introduction to GAMIT/GLOBK, GAMIT Reference Manual, and GLOBK Reference Manual. Much of the lecture material will be the same as prior courses, so a review of the presentation from the recent Miami GAMIT workshop could be useful.
Instructors: Bob King (MIT-USA), Jean-Mathieu Nocquet (GeoAzur-France), Edmundo Norabuena (IGP), Francis Bondoux (IRD) and Hugo Perfettini (IRD.

To register for this short course, send an email to Bob King rwkchandler.mit) indicating your organization and experience with the software. There is no fee but participants will be responsible for their own travel and living expenses. Registration is limited to 20 people and may be restricted to two from any one organization. Further information is available on the IGP web site


GPS Data Analysis and Modeling Using GAMIT/GLOBK/DEFNODE

November 16-19, 2010
University of Miami, FL
This workshop will combine GPS data processing and analysis using the GAMIT/GLOBK software with modeling of secular and time-dependent motion of GPS stations using DEFNODE. Participants will be expected to have exercised the software on their own before the workshop and should bring laptops with the software installed or with remote access to their own labs. The format will include both presentations and one-on-one tutoring using the participants' own data.
Instructors: Bob King, MIT; Rob McCaffrey, Portland State; Tim Dixon and Shimon Wdowinski, Miami.


TLS: Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) Methods and Applications in Geologic Research and Education

October 30, 2010, 8am-5pm
Geolocial Society of America 2010 Annual Meeting, Denver, CO
This workshop will provide faculty, students, and professionals with the basic principles of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), aka ground-based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data, an overview of various TLS platforms, and examples of science and education applications. This one-day workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high-resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire, and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring. Limited financial support is available for students. For more information and to register, visit the GSA 2010 Short Course Website. Course Materials
Instructors: John Oldow, University of Texas at Dallas; Carlos Aiken, University of Texas at Dallas; David Phillips, UNAVCO


Getting Started with PBO Strainmeter Data

August 25 - 27, 2010
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
PBO strainmeters provide better strain resolution than GPS and can record strain transients at periods much longer than broadband seismometers. This workshop will begin with the basic concepts of strain and give a background in instrumentation for monitoring crustal deformation. This is a hands-on course. Topics covered will include, retrieving and plotting strain data, assessing strainmeter data quality, borehole strainmeter calibration, tidal analysis and prediction of tidal time-series.
Instructors: Evelyn Roeloffs, USGS; Kathleen Hodgkinson, UNAVCO; Duncan Agnew, SIO; and Ryan Day (USGS, CVO)


InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications for Geoscientists

August 16-18, 2010
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. Terabytes of InSAR data were collected for the EarthScope program that spans the entire US. Training new scientists for the interpretation of these important data sets is critical to the EarthScope mission. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). This short course will also help prepare scientists for the upcoming NASA InSAR mission, now called DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice). New techniques and applications of InSAR are rapidly developing, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. A 2.5 day workshop will introduce InSAR processing and applications to new users. If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The workshop includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, an introduction to a common processing package, and an overview of different processing packages. In a hands-on session (“tinker time”), the students will use the InSAR software to process example data. An additional optional module on Wednesday afternoon will cover subpixel ground motions from glaciers, landslides, earthquakes, etc. measured from pairs of optical and SAR images using a technique called pixel or feature tracking.
Faculty: Paul Rosen, JPL; Eric Fielding, JPL; and Matthew Pritchard, Cornell University


Planning for the Future of Geo-cybereducation Workshop

January 6-8, 2010
Hilton Arlington and Towers, Arlington, Virginia
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The National Science Foundation (EHR) has made an investment (tens of millions of dollars) in the continuum from research to the classroom. The challenge facing NSF is that past investments are not well connected nor utilized by K-18 students and teachers. We as a geoscience community do not understand the skills and assets of our own scientific researchers and educators.

The purpose of the Geo-Cyberlearning Workshop is to examine the components in existence in terms of NSF programs, datasets, and users. We need to understand the techniques and issues for how and why K-18 teachers, faculty, and students use the data, or what the barriers are for not utilizing databases resulting from NSF-funded projects. We will explore points of collaboration and find methods to make the audiences work together and be sustainable.

List of Registrants

Please visit the Planning for the Future of Geo-cybereducation website for information regarding the outcome of the meeting.

Contact Jeff Ryan (ryan@cas.suf.edu) for more information concerning meeting content.


INTERFACE Workshop: Recent Developments in the Methods and Applications of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-based LiDAR) in Geologic Research and Education


October 16, 2009 8am–5pm
Geological Society of America Annual Meeting 2009, Portland, OR
Oregon Convention Center, F150
This workshop will provide faculty, students, and professionals with the basic principles of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), aka ground-based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data, an overview of various TLS platforms, and examples of science and education applications. This one-day workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high-resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire, and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring.
Instructors: John Oldow and Carlos Aiken, Univ. of Texas at Dallas; David Phillips, UNAVCO.


InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications for Geoscientists

August 17-19, 2009
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. Terrabytes of InSAR data were collected for the EarthScope program that spans the entire US. Training new scientists for the interpretation of these important data sets is critical to the EarthScope mission. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). This short course will also help prepare scientists for the upcoming NASA InSAR mission, now called DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice). New techniques and applications of InSAR are rapidly developing, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. A three day workshop will introduce InSAR processing and applications to new users. If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The workshop includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, an introduction to a common processing package, and an overview of different processing packages. An additional optional module* will cover subpixel ground motions from glaciers, landslides, earthquakes, etc. measured from pairs of optical and SAR images using a technique called pixel or feature tracking.
Faculty: Paul Rosen, JPL; Eric Fielding, JPL; and Matthew Pritchard, Cornell University


Workshop & Science Planning for the Evaluation, Monitoring and Communication of Volcanic and Seismic Hazards in East Africa (not part of the Short Courses)

August 17-20, 2009
ICTP - Adriatico Guest House - Kastler Lecture Hall, Trieste, Italy

Final White Paper - Advanced Workshop on Evaluating, Monitoring, and Communicating Volcanic and Seismic Hazards in East Africa

A workshop and business meeting that convened for US, African, and European scientists to develop and enhance plans for investigations of processes leading to volcanic eruptions and large earthquakes in continental rift zones, with emphasis on the evaluation, monitoring and communication of volcanic and seismic hazards in East Africa. The two-day workshop (August 18-19) and associated planning/business sessions (August 17, 20) provided strategic guidance to the international community based on lessons learned from natural hazards in Africa and elsewhere.

NSF provided funds for US participants to travel to Trieste for the workshop and science-planning meeting. These preceded a two-week professional development course for African geoscientists supported by ICTP, ICSU, African Union, Royal Society/NERC, and UNAVCO in Trieste, Italy.

The workshop goals were to establish a new initiative for cooperation in East Africa, to design programs to comprehensively evaluate and monitor the time and length scales of plate boundary and volcanic deformation, and to develop networks for exchange of ideas and expertise. In so doing, participants augmented and strengthened research plans, ensuring the broadest impact with future volcanic and seismic hazard-related projects. The science and planning results fed directly into the international workshop.

Organizing Committee:
Cindy Ebinger, University of Rochester
Eric Calais, University of Purdue
Abdelkarim Aoudia, ICTP, Italy
Gezahegn Yirgu, University of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

UNAVCO PI: M. Meghan Miller

Speakers: Ross Stein, Robert Tilling, Simon Carn, Andy Nyblade, Giday WoldeGabriel, Roger Buck


Exploring the Yellowstone Hotspot Using EarthScope Data: A One-day Workshop for Teachers

May 12, 2009
EarthScope National Meeting, Centre on the Grove - Boise, Idaho - Cottonwoods South Conference Room
This workshop is designed to provide information, activities, and materials that teachers can use in their classrooms to teach Earth and physical sciences. Teachers will be shown how to use seismic and Global Positioning System (GPS) data in the classroom to enhance their students' basic understanding of abstract science concepts and develop critical thinking skills as they investigate multiple lines of evidence gathered through data from the EarthScope program. Teachers will be shown demonstrations of different types of visualizations that researchers have developed from EarthScope data that make the geophysical processes ‘come alive’ for the students. All activities are aligned with National Science Standards. Through an exploration of EarthScope learning activities as they relate to the geology and geophysics of the Snake River Plain and evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot, participants will:

  • Hear researchers describe how and why EarthScope is investigating the geophysics of the local area
  • Understand how past and present day geologic and geophysical phenomena can help us understand what could happen in the future
  • Improve participants’ foundation in basic physics concepts as applied to earth science
  • Be able to implement selected EarthScope activities in their classrooms
Lunch provided; mileage and one night’s hotel available for non-local participants. EarthScope will work with you and your school district to pay for a substitute teacher. Registration will be provided for those local teachers who wish to attend EarthScope national meeting sessions. Funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

Level: Limited to teachers of middle through high school Earth science and physical science.
Instructors: IRIS and UNAVCO education staff with EarthScope research scientists


Getting Started with PBO Strainmeter Data

May 12, 2009
EarthScope National Meeting, Centre on the Grove - Boise, Idaho - Firs South Conference Room
PBO strainmeters provide better strain resolution than GPS and can record strain transients at periods much longer than broadband seismometers. This workshop will describe how the strainmeters work, present examples of tectonic strain transients recorded by PBO strainmeters, and outline how to access and work with the data. Although this will not be a hands-on workshop, we will provide a guide to online documentation and software that facilitate working with the strainmeter data. Lunch and snacks will be provided.
Instructors: Evelyn Roeloffs, USGS; Kathleen Hodgkinson, UNAVCO; and Duncan Agnew, SIO
Agenda


New Data and Data Tools for EarthScope Data at UNAVCO and Other EarthScope Facilities

May 12, 2009
EarthScope National Meeting, Centre on the Grove - Boise, Idaho - Pines Conference Room
EarthScope witnessed an explosion of new data and data access tools in 2008. The focus of this workshop is a hands-on introduction to these data and tools. New data access tools include the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Core Viewer, which allows users to view high-resolution photographs of the entire main borehole drill core via a Google Maps interface and which is being extended to support the SAFOD sample request program. UNAVCO's new Data Archive Interface Version 2 offers a much more intuitive and powerful way of locating and accessing Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) continuous GPS data. The EarthScope Data Portal extends the suite of available tools to allow seamless station discovery and data download across all EarthScope station types. New EarthScope data include large airborne LIDAR acquisitions over active faults and volcanic domains in the Western United States and Alaska, meteorology data sets from recently installed met stations at PBO continuous GPS sites, and tiltmeter measurements from instruments collocated with PBO borehole strainmeters and seismometers. Geophysically interesting examples from all three data sets will be presented along with a broader overview of the data and specifics of data access.
Instructors: Adrian Borsa and Fran Boler, UNAVCO
UNAVCO SAR Archives and Data Services
UNAVCO Data Archive Interface Version 2 (DAIv2) Web GUI
UNAVCO Data Center GNSS Archives


Methods for Estimating Western US GPS Velocity Field

May 12, 2009
EarthScope National Meeting, Centre on the Grove - Boise, Idaho - Snake River Conference Room
The purpose of this half-day workshop is to present and discuss methods for determining a GPS velocity field that unifies all available campaign and continuous GPS into a single solution with a common reference frame. The ultimate goal of this exercise is to create such a unified velocity field and make it widely available through UNAVCO for research in active tectonics and earthquake mechanics and application to natural hazards and precise geodetic positioning. The workshop format will permit a small number of invited presentations, breakout groups to consider particular technical issues, and sufficient time for extended discussion. The expected output is a series of recommendations for further research, public archiving of raw data and velocity products, and candidate methodologies for producing first general velocity fields for the western US. For more information, please contact the conveners.
Conveners: Wayne Thatcher (USGS), Tom Herring (MIT), Chuck Meertens (UNAVCO)
Agenda
Registrants


Processing and Analysis of GPS Data with GAMIT/GLOBK/TRACK

September 23-25, 2008
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
This course will provide group and (some) individual instruction in GPS data analysis, with Tuesday devoted to GAMIT and GLOBK for tectonic studies, Wednesday to polar and other kinematic applications of TRACK, and Thursday to tutorials and in-depth discussion of advanced topics for both static and kinematic analysis. Participants should bring laptops with the software installed or with remote access to the software in their own labs. They will be expected to have read the documentation, run the provided examples, and attempted to process their own data.
Faculty: Tom Herring, Bob King, and Simon McClusky, MIT; Matt King, University of Newcastle


InSAR: An introduction to Processing and Applications for Geoscientists

June 16-18, 2008
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a powerful tool for measuring Earth surface deformation due to earthquakes, volcanic unrest, ground water migration, and anthropogenic activity. InSAR is also being increasingly used in studies of cryosphere (motion of glaciers and ice sheets) and atmosphere (water content in the troposphere). New techniques and applications of InSAR are rapidly developing, including stacking, time-series analysis of surface deformation, ScanSAR, polarimetric InSAR, and along-track interferometry. A three day workshop will introduce InSAR processing and applications to new users. If you have considered using InSAR data and imagery in your research or want to learn more about how to apply InSAR to new areas of research, this workshop is for you. The workshop includes an overview of the technology and its application to Earth Science, an introduction to a common processing package, and an overview of different processing packages.
Faculty: Paul Rosen, JPL; Yuri Fialko, University of California San Diego; Eric Fielding, JPL


Working with Strainmeter and Tiltmeter Data: A Short Course for New Users

June10-12, 2008
UNAVCO, Boulder, Colorado
This 2.5 day workshop will cover the main topics involved in processing strainmeter data with the purpose to help make EarthScope data useful to a broad scientific audience. The target audience is graduate students and practicing scientists interested in studying plate boundary, earthquake, and volcano deformation.
Faculty: Kathleen Hodgkinson, UNAVCO; Evelyn Roeloffs, USGS; Duncan Agnew, University of California, San Diego


Processing and Analysis of GeoEarthscope and Other Community LiDAR Topography Datasets

April 29 - May 1, 2008
Arizona State University: Tempe, AZ
LiDAR—Light Detection and Ranging (also Airborne Laser Swath Mapping-ALSM) topographic data are of broad interest to earth scientists. Many datasets are or will be available freely to the scientific community, especially for fault systems in the western United States via the GeoEarthscope project. These data have exciting and powerful applications in geomorphology, active tectonics, and geoscience education. Participants in this course will learn about LiDAR technology, access to publicly available datasets, software and hardware considerations for working with the data, data processing (raw or classified point clouds, digital elevation models, other derived products), and approaches for analyzing the data to answer their research questions.
Faculty: Chris Crosby, GEON Project, SDSC; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; David Phillips, UNAVCO


Using GPS Data to Study Crustal Deformation, Earthquakes, and Volcanism: A Workshop for College Faculty*

March 18, 2008: 1:00-5:00pm
Geological Society of America Cordilleran / Rocky Mountain Section Meeting, Las Vegas, NV
Helmut Mayer, mayerunavco.org, Cornee Kreemer, kreemerunr.edu; Susan Eriksson, erikssonunavco.org
This course is geared toward faculty at two- and four-year institutions who teach general science education and introductory or lower level geoscience courses in which plate tectonics is a topic. Faculty will be introduced to place-based, data-rich educational materials about GPS and plate tectonics to use in their classrooms, receive an introduction to high-precision GPS, and have the opportunity to discuss pedagogical strategies for classroom implementation. Anticipated topics include recent advances in researching slow earthquakes in Cascadia, movement along the San Andreas fault, and monitoring volcano deformation. Although individuals with GPS experience are welcome, knowledge of GPS is not required. Participants should bring a laptop computer, preferably with wireless internet capability. Those without access to a lap top computer should contact Helmut Mayer, mayerunavco.org, 303-381-7551. Course materials can be accessed on the GSA 2008 Workshop Page on UNAVCO's Community Website.
* This course is not part of the official Short Courses.


Using GPS Data to Learn about Tectonic Plate Movement, Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and other Applications: A Workshop for Educators in Secondary Education*

October 28, 2007: 1:00-5:00 pm
Geological Society of America Annual Meeting & Exposition: Denver, CO
Susan C. Eriksson, UNAVCO; Shelley E. Olds, UNAVCO
This course is geared toward educators in middle and high schools who teach earth science or a science course in which plate tectonics is a topic. Educators will be introduced to place-based, data-rich educational materials about global positioning system (GPS) and plate tectonics to use in their classrooms, receive an introduction to high-precision GPS, and have the opportunity to discuss pedagogical strategies for classroom implementation. Anticipated topics include faulting along the San Andreas fault, monitoring volcano deformation, and recent advances in researching slow earthquakes in Cascadia. Although individuals with GPS experience are welcome, knowledge of GPS is not required. Participants are encouraged but not required to bring a laptop computer.
* This course is not part of the official Short Courses.


Processing and Analysis of GeoEarthscope and Other Community LiDAR Topography Datasets

October 27, 2007
Geological Society of America Annual Meeting & Exposition: Denver, CO
Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; Chris Crosby, Arizona State University; David Phillips, UNAVCO
LiDAR—Light, Distance, and Ranging (also Airborne Laser Swath Mapping-ALSM) topographic data are of broad interest to earth scientists. Many datasets are or will be available freely to the scientific community, especially for fault systems in the western United States via the GeoEarthscope project. These data have exciting and powerful applications in geomorphology, active tectonics, and geoscience education. Participants in this course will learn about LiDAR technology, access to publicly available datasets, software and hardware considerations for working with the data, data processing (raw or classified point clouds, digital elevation models, other derived products), and approaches for analyzing the data to answer their research questions.


Using GPS Data to Study Crustal Deformation, Earthquakes, and Volcanism: A Workshop for College Faculty

October 22-25, 2006
Geological Society of America Annual Meeting: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Geared toward college faculty who teach introductory/general education geoscience courses, participants will be introduced to place based, data-rich educational materials about GPS and plate tectonics to use in their classrooms. Anticipated topics include episodic tremor and slip in the Cascadia Subduction Zone and monitoring volcano deformation. Participants will also receive a GPS primer and have the opportunity to discuss pedagogical strategies for implementing the activities in their classrooms.


GPS Data Analysis (GAMIT/GLOBK): A Short Course for Intermediate and Experienced Users

June 12-14, 2006
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
This is a 2.5 day intermediate-level short course in GPS analysis using the GAMIT/GLOBK software for crustal motion studies. Topics include automatic processing of continuous and survey-mode networks; handling step-displacements due to earthquakes and instrument changes; temporal and spatial filtering of time series. The course instructors are: Tom Herring, MIT, and Robert King, MIT. Online registration is available now.


Working with Strainmeter and Tiltmeter Data: A Short Course for New Users

June 14-16, 2006
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
This 2.5 day workshop will cover the main topics involved in processing strainmeter data with the purpose to help make EarthScope data useful to a broad scientific audience. The target audience is graduate students and practicing scientists interested in modeling plate boundary, earthquake, and volcano deformation. Faculty are Kathleen Hodgkinson, Plate Boundary Observatory; Evelyn Roeloffs, USGS; and Duncan Agnew, University of California, San Diego. Limited funding is available for student participation. Online registration is available now.
Click here for information on registration, travel, and course details.


Working with Strainmeter and Tiltmeter Data: A Short Course for New Users

July 12-14, 2005
UNAVCO: Boulder, Colorado
Topics covered included: Overview of strainmeter/tiltmeters, viewing/editing raw strainmeter data, power spectra and noise in strainmeter data, Earth tides, BAYTAP, predicting tides, intermediate to long term trends, data filtering and minimum phase filters, cross-spectral analysis and theory, laser strainmeter correction series, calibration of 3-component borehole strainmeters, ocean loads, SPOTL, hydrological coupling, PBO strainmeter metadata.

Last modified Wednesday, 16-Apr-2014 22:56:24 UTC